Mexican Earthquake is the Strongest in Centuries

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Mexican Earthquake is the Strongest in Centuries

Soldiers checking out the rummage of the earthquake.

Soldiers checking out the rummage of the earthquake.

Courtesy of NBC News

Soldiers checking out the rummage of the earthquake.

Courtesy of NBC News

Courtesy of NBC News

Soldiers checking out the rummage of the earthquake.

Stephen Serrano, Section Editor

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Earthquakes anywhere in the world hit too close to home for Californians. In this case, a calamity occurred late on Thursday, September 7, 2017 in Juchitán de Zaragoza, Mexico. Centered near the coast of Chiapas, an 8.1 magnitude earthquake struck the surrounding state, causing devastating destruction.

According to CNN, the quake was felt by 50 million people in Mexico. Just in the states of Chiapas and Oaxaca alone, 9 million people were affected. The earthquake was the strongest since 1885, which killed about 9,500 people. Even people in Mexico City and parts of Guatemala could feel the shake.

Following the initial quake, the US Geological Survey (USGS) reported that there were six aftershocks that measured a 5.0 magnitude. President Peña Nieto says that “about 1.85 million homes lost electricity, but 74% of them have had service returned.” Another outcome of the harsh earthquake was a tsunami warning on the coast of Mexico. Reaching taller than 10 feet, the tsunami could potentially reach Ecuador, New Zealand, and Vanuatu.

Around 96 people have died out of the catastrophe. Nick Deang (10) believes that “the earthquake was very sad and I hope that all the people hurt will be strengthened by the support of Americans.” Chiapas, being the poorest Mexican state, was hit the hardest, so Direct Relief Mexico is working their hardest to help those who need it.  

Even though the Mexican Red Cross has helped out with our Hurricanes Harvey and Irma in our own backyard, they are now diverting their efforts to the earthquake. Some Americans think that it is rude to withdraw their help, but they would do the same for the US. Agreeing with the Mexican Red Cross, Maddie Cusick (10) says that “people should help their country before anyone else’s. Mexico cannot give help if their country is not stable.” As a country, we should do the best we can to help both our hurricanes and the disaster in Mexico.

Prayers and donations go out to the people who were affected by the terrible earthquake. Mexico should stay strong until buildings are safe and people are aided.

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